Tamarack Institute Webinar 

Black Ancestries and Relations
for a Just Climate Future

The Path Forward in So-Called Canada

June 12, 2024 | 1:00-2:30 PM ET 

 

Description

Join Tamarack Institute and Black Eco Bloom for an invaluable conversation centered around the relationship between Black peoples living on Turtle Island and how they play a critical role in shaping responses to climate change. The conversation will delve into the intersectionality of Black ancestral knowledge and their impact on areas such as food justice, culture, and Indigenous ways of knowing. 

Join us to discover the unique narratives of Black ancestries from the Maritimes to the Prairies, and beyond, as we explore the connection to Atlantic displacement and its relevance to Canada's political ecology. Prepare for a storytelling journey that offers insights into the intricate connections between climate change and Black communities' relationships to the land, labour, and ancestry. 

 

Speakers

Jaqueline Dwyer, MES, Co-Founder Toronto Black Farmers and Food Growers Collective Jacqueline-Dwyer

Jacqueline Dwyer an avid farmer for 11 years of urban and rural food production experience and community food planning with 33+ neighbourhoods. Jacqueline and her team saw the need to create “clean food” friendly culture for the Black community in Toronto as Black households are the most food insecure in Toronto. She always shares her seasonal harvest with family, friends, and neighbors at the end of season harvest event through an annually community food gathering at her urban farm. 

 

Radia Mbengue, Humanitarian MEAL Program Officer, Oxfam CanadaRadia-Mbengue-square

Originally from Senegal, Radia is an advocate for international development and gender equality. Her journey includes collaborative efforts with transnational organizations across Africa, focusing on issues like gender-based violence and the implementation of UNSCR1325 in the Great Lakes Region. She has also worked as a GBV consultant for the World Bank. She brings diverse expertise in conflict resolution, gender in emergencies, and Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, with a strong passion for decolonization and socioeconomic empowerment, especially for racialized communities and youth. 

 

Tyjana Connolly, Executive Director and Co-Founder, Black Eco BloomTyjana-Connolly

Tyjana Connolly (she/her)  is a passionate community builder and organizer. She is currently Executive Director and co-founder of Black Eco Bloom, a sustainable development organization that focuses on environmental education, and community-based solutions to tackle climate change, specifically empowering Black women and gender-diverse individuals in climate action leadership, as well as a BIPOC Fellow at the Sustainable Capacity Building Institute. 

 

Shanese Steele, Senior Community Animator, Equity and Reconciliation, Tamarack Instituteshanese-1

Shanese Anne Indoowaaboo Steele is an Afro-Indigenous femme who resides and works on the ancestral lands of the Missauagek and Potwatomi peoples. As a Métis and Black individual with Trinidadian and Grenadian roots and familial ties to the Anishinaabe community, she navigates the intricate web of diasporic experiences that connect visitors to these lands with their original inhabitants. Shanese's work is an intricate tapestry woven from the traditional wisdom of her Métis and Anishinaabe ancestors, her Black heritage, and her commitment to decolonial, Queer, feminist, and pro-Black principles.

 

We Hope To SEe You There 

Our webinars are free of charge. Already have an account within our Learning Centre? Click the Register button below. 

Don't have an account yet? Click the Sign Up button and you'll gain access to our Learning Centre and webinar registration.